Winterization plates

I am looking for winterization plates for the front cowling on a Cessna 177B. Does any one know where I could purchase them?

Comments

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Try a bone yard like Wentworth. That might be the cheapest way. Or, make your own or have your mechanic make them for you. That's what I did.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Appreciate your response. I will try Wentworth.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Let me know if you need another boneyard, there are several.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Scott, Are you aware of any/need for plates on 182’s? 1960 vintage.. Thanks

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    need: yes. Any time the ambient air temp goes below 50F on the ground it's time to consider them. Keep an eye on your oil temp. It should stay around 180 degrees F in cruise. When it starts to go below that, it's time for those plates. I made my own with scrap aluminum from my A&P shop. Measure, bend to U shape, drill a hole for a bolt, done.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Thanks. I fabricated for my 172. Same “process” for 182? (Which is STILL in avionics shop.)

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Hi Kent, mine is still in "annual" too. Frustrating. Oh well, my mechanic says I'll have it for Xmas, lol. BTW, we should talk about what we put in our airplanes on this forum. I'll post something.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Has anyone got a picture to share of home made winter plates so I can bend one up?

  • I couldn't find a photo of my inlet shroud cover, but here is what I covered up on my 172-A. Mine is a simple plate, which I screw on every winter, then remove in the spring. With this closed, cylinder temps do stay above 200 degrees, even at +5F.
    I'll try to get you more photos later.

  • Thanks, but mine is a 182 and I know it is a cover for the oil cooler on my passenger side upper cowl opening.
  • I’ve had the same issue with my 182Q. I placed alum. tape over the oil cooler, in cold weather still only get it to about 160 indicated.. just to be sure, had my mech check sensor. It’s accurate. Think I might install winterization plates on both sides to see if that helps.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    160 is probably close enough. With my TSIO-360 I never get above 160 or so.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Everything I read says we really need 180 degrees for at leasr 30 minutes to burn off moisture in the crankcase. I generally run in the 190’s in warmer weather in the 182 with the Cont. O-470.
  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator
    edited March 1

    It all depends on where the temperature sensor is located. My original factory temp probe is near the oil cooler and reads about 130 degrees. My newer JPI EDM-830 probe is at the front of the engine where it reads about 160. The temperature of engine oil varies as it moves around the engine.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Sensor location makes sense. With tape fully covering my oil cooler, I was concerned I was over heating. So my Mech ran it up to operating temps, then pulled my dip stick and checked my temps with a non-contact thermometer. The non-contact temp indicated was very close to what my JPI oil temp indicated. I've been running like that for about a year now, about 3/4 covered in the summer (in Ohio), fully covered in the winter.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    I don't know what I did for 50 years without an engine monitor. :)

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

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