1964 172F Model

Great Flying bird I purchased 2 years ago with only 2000 hours on airframe. Multiple little minor checks and tweeks but a great flying bird.

Comments

  • JgoaviationJgoaviation Flight Captain

    Good looking classic 172!

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Beautiful plane! And amazing night photo.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Love the classic look! Well preserved.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Kent, are you talking about the plane or your image in the mirror? :)

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Nice plane! I have a 1965 C172F and I love it! Just wondering, does your's have electric flaps? I believe 1965 was the first year for electric flaps, but I could be wrong.

  • edited May 2019

    Great pic! I owned the unit that was 369 positions ahead of you in the Cessna assemble line back in 1964 - N7908U.

  • I was reading about the 172F here and you mentioned electric flaps... I have a question about the electric flaps that you might be able to answer. I have a 1965 172F with electric flaps. My question is; do your flaps coast after releasing the flap switch handle? When I say coast, I mean; they don't stop immediately upon release of the flap switch. Mine coast and I am guessing this is normal due to the design of the motor and the motor not having a brake. It makes it hard to get the correct 10,20,30 flap setting and the indicator isn't very accurate. Can you confirm that yours is the same as mine??

    Thanks for your feedback.

  • It is the same as yours, in fact Cessna used this flap extension system for several models. Mine "coast" but it's not much. Once I lift my fingers off the flap switch they pretty much come to a stop. In my case, I don't think the coasting would be worth more than a few degrees. Cessna flap extension mechanics are more art than science anyway. Assuming you have the old Cessna gauge, the flap ranges showing on the gauge aren't linear. The 30 and 40 degree extents are sort of smooshed together while the 10 and 20 have a noticeable gap between them.

    After you halt the extension, what do you estimate the continued flap extension is adding to the setting you intended?

    Have your mechanic weigh in on this. It may be time for a new Cessna flap motor. IF that's the case, the good news is that in airplane dollars, this is couch change (<$1000). The parts places have all sorts of them and the repair/replacement time is minimal.

  • I would say they move 3-5 degrees more after letting go of the switch. The indicator isn't accurate. I have used a protractor to measure the degree setting and marked the tracks with a magic marker so I know what the 10,20,30,40 settings are. While checking this, I also lifted up on the flaps to take out any play and to simulate an air load on them so the marks would be accurate. You definitely have to anticipate the position you want and release the switch early. It's been that way since I bought it last year and I just wanted to know if anyone had or has the same experience as I do on the same vintage aircraft. I know the system may have change as they produced newer aircraft so it probably isn't fair to compare to aircraft that aren't of the same age. I am an A&P but most of my experience is on Jets...LOL. So limited experience/reference to go by regarding information on these flap motors. It maybe just the way these motors are built...

    Thanks for the feedback.

  • Oh! You ARE a mechanic! Then you've weighed in! I'm thinking this falls into the category of "one of those Cessna things" (like uneven fuel tank feeding) because 3-5 degrees is about what I estimate my flap drift is. Not that that's perfect, but I've had two Cessna's now with the same kind of flap system (and same as the one you have) and the habits are identical.

  • Okay, I appreciate your feedback!! Sounds like a "normal" thing then. Does yours indicate very close to 40 on your indicator when you are at 30 degrees? My indicator moves almost none when going from 30-40 since it is almost bottomed out. I would say my 10 degree setting reads 15 degrees on the indicator and 20 reads about 30 and 30 is very close to 40 on the indicator. I haven't tried to adjust the RVDT/LVDT to see if I can get the indication closer as of yet though. Have you had any luck with adjusting the indicator?

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