Angle of attack systems

I fly a 182P (1973) and I'm interested in thoughts on the value, need, etc. of these systems. I'm VFR rated and fly around 75 hrs per year. Based near Charlotte, NC.

Comments

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    There's alot of people that really like AOA's. I have one in my plane built into my Aspen PFD. I look at it once in a while but I confess that I don't use it much.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • JgoaviationJgoaviation Flight Captain

    I’ll go out on a limb and say that as a VFR pilot that operates from normal airports there isn’t a need for an AOA system other than for gee wiz data.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    That's how I feel, too. If I had a really short runway or one with obstructions on the end that required extra-ordinary maneuvering perhaps it would come in handy.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • I’ve got a 172F. I wanted some backup to the old round gauges. I’ve installed vg’s and was interested in adding aoa. I looked at many options, mostly expensive, and decided to buy the BOM from Levil aviation. It’s getting installed late this week. I’ll let everyone know how it goes.

  • GregDrewGregDrew Flight Attendant
    edited February 2020

    I have used the Garmin AOA in two aircraft and value having it onboard. If you think about it, the AOA does not issue a severe warning very often because we all fly pretty well most of the time. But for that one time where the angle of attack enters a risky profile and the pilot is busy, that is where I want (and need) the warning. I have received that warning twice in the last 500 hours and it was well worth it. Last point, the AOA is inexpensive equipment, so I recommend it to any pilot.

  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Good to know, thanks Drew.

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • Observations on flying with an angle of attack indicator for the last eight years installed in a C185 (prior to the current fad of add-ons at the time requiring a field approval). I do regard it as a safety enhancement in preventing some LOC scenarios.

    The AOA is a useful addition more so if the angle of attack indicator is within your visual field when landing. If one has to look down at the panel to see the indicator it defeats the purpose to a large extent (looking inside the cockpit when we should be looking outside). A heads up display option Is available and works much better than the LED or instrument panel varieties. If using the LED type it should be mounted on or just under the glare shield in your field of view when looking ahead of the airplane.

    There is significant value when used in instructional scenarios and possibly for early Upset training and aerobatic exploration.

    Flying into backcountry short strips with mountainous surroundings, the AOA is a real boon. It lets you know what your lift reserve is and eases the stress when flying in canyons, looking at rock faces while performing canyon turns and landing on short strips on back of drag curve.

    When flying instrument approaches single pilot down to minimums or having to go missed make the angle of attack indicator a useful tool.

    For general day-to-day flying it is also helps when one is flying an unfamiliar aircraft.

    If one has the option for a heads up display the AOA indicator is useful for the base to final turn and also helpful in preventing a stall in the flare during training.

    Hope this has been helpful. Take care!
  • Scott ShererScott Sherer COO Forum Moderator

    Thanks Michael!

    Scott Sherer
    Wright Brothers Master Pilot, FAA Commercial Pilot
    Aviation Director, Cessna Owners Organization Forum Moderator and Cessna Owners Author.

    Need help? Let me know!

  • I think adding AOA makes sense for any pilot VFR or IFR in fact isn't one of it biggest advantages on final approach when you often not IFR anymore. Any pilot can get in trouble here especially when weather suggests a faster approach speed. Mooney pilots were having a big problem here and adding AOA has really helped. I did an article in July 2016 on the subject "Working the Angles". The only change I see in AOA since I wrote this is the number of "probeless" offers out there today. Note: We (Cessna Owners) gave away an Alpha Eagle system at Oshkosh two years ago and one of our members with a Cessna 150 won it. Last time I talked to him he did not want to spend the dollars to install it. I sent him an email. Hopefully he will jump in here if he still has it.

  • mfuesting@gmail.commfuesting@gmail.com Flight Attendant

    Bob,
    I recently installed the u-vonics A20S (probeless) and it works great! What I like best is that it is hooked into the audio panel and really lets you know when AOA is getting out of wack.
    My key reason for installing was that with the great noise canceling headsets that we wear, I really find it difficult to hear the Cessna stall warning horn anymore. This does an excellent job of fixing that for safety!

  • Flew C-206 near gross weight in and out of bush air strips in Africa and the AoA was a welcome tool.

  • If the award winner doesn’t want his AOA I’d be interested in finding out how much he wants for it.


    Gary Van Dyke

  • @Cessnakevin said:
    I’ve got a 172F. I wanted some backup to the old round gauges. I’ve installed vg’s and was interested in adding aoa. I looked at many options, mostly expensive, and decided to buy the BOM from Levil aviation. It’s getting installed late this week. I’ll let everyone know how it goes.

    How did it go? Any updates?

  • @Michael g said:
    Observations on flying with an angle of attack indicator for the last eight years installed in a C185 (prior to the current fad of add-ons at the time requiring a field approval). I do regard it as a safety enhancement in preventing some LOC scenarios.

    The AOA is a useful addition more so if the angle of attack indicator is within your visual field when landing. If one has to look down at the panel to see the indicator it defeats the purpose to a large extent (looking inside the cockpit when we should be looking outside). A heads up display option Is available and works much better than the LED or instrument panel varieties. If using the LED type it should be mounted on or just under the glare shield in your field of view when looking ahead of the airplane.

    There is significant value when used in instructional scenarios and possibly for early Upset training and aerobatic exploration.

    Flying into backcountry short strips with mountainous surroundings, the AOA is a real boon. It lets you know what your lift reserve is and eases the stress when flying in canyons, looking at rock faces while performing canyon turns and landing on short strips on back of drag curve.

    When flying instrument approaches single pilot down to minimums or having to go missed make the angle of attack indicator a useful tool.

    For general day-to-day flying it is also helps when one is flying an unfamiliar aircraft.

    If one has the option for a heads up display the AOA indicator is useful for the base to final turn and also helpful in preventing a stall in the flare during training.

    Hope this has been helpful. Take care!

    Hello
    I have A Cessna U206G , I planning to install a AoA. Which model do you advise regardless financial aspect.
    Thanks
    Alain

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